http://lifehacker.com/everything-i-learned-about-relationships-by-sucking-at-1758251692

if you want to get a date, be someone dateable. Take an interest in yourself. Learn how to dress better</span></a>. Pick up an interesting hobby. Make new friends</span></a>. Hell, shower</em> more than once a week. The more you invest in yourself as a confident, complete person, the more people around you will be drawn to that.

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I had to learn that it wasn’t weak or shameful to accept rejection at face value. No one needs to justify their decision to reject someone, and it’s not romantic to keep hounding the same person for months or years at a time. It’s creepy, and it becomes harassment sooner than you’d realize.

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Which is a shame because I also learned that getting rejected was freeing, in a way. When you can accept rejection as a normal, natural part of dating that doesn’t condemn you as a loser, you’re free to move on.

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feeling jealous didn’t automatically mean that my position was correct. Like any other emotion, it’s an indicator of a problem. Maybe it’s insecurity, maybe it’s a trust issue, or maybe I was just too controlling. Rather than making the other person change, I had to examine my own jealousy to figure out what the underlying issue was.

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Digging into why you feel jealous can help reveal what scares you in a relationship. When you call out the underlying issue, you can deal with it directly.

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Keeping my problems to myself didn’t help anyone. Instead, I had to learn to identify the legitimate problems I had, and bring them up in a constructive way</span></a>.

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In the end, being honest about the problems I had actually led to more breakups. This was my biggest fear but, like rejection, I found it was a net positive.