http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-10-08/us-government-just-crossed-rubicon

In 49 BC, a defiant Julius Caesar stood in front of his army at the River Rubicon and made the biggest decision of his life.

It was strictly forbidden by Roman law for a general lead his army out of its province and into Rome. And the Rubicon marked the boundary.

“Alea iacta est!” (The die is cast!) he said, and led his army across the river into civil war.

The phrase “crossing the Rubicon” has stuck for more than 2,000 years, signifying a risky and dangerous point of no return.</strong>

Of course, Julius Caesar didn’t learn that lesson either.</strong>

After crossing the Rubicon, he won a long civil war, after which the Roman Senate made him dictator for life.

And fearing he would abuse it, he was assassinated just a few weeks later by the very people who entrusted him with that power.